22 August 2013

Ford UK Car Production 1968 - 1978

I posted Ford car production from 1979-1992 a while back, which you can see by clicking here. I have now found data for the previous eleven years.

The Cortina and Escort were the mainstay of production for this period, with others in a supporting role.

The Capri came and went in this time, proving to be a popular car for a niche segment.

The Granada / Consul didn't last long in UK production as it was soon transferred to Germany. I presume numbers didn't justify two plants making them.

The MK IV Zephyr / Zodiac was not that popular looking at those production numbers (I had a nice Dinky car of the latter though), and the Corsair was on the way out by the late 60's. Just over 300,000 in total were made of the latter.

Yr Total Cortina Escort Fiesta Capri Gr/Con Ze/Zod Corsair
68 486,500 261,800 161,700 - 3,100 - 24,700 35,200
69 524,000 265,900 145,000 - 79,600 - 19,900 13,600
70 450,600 195,400 156,700 - 69,200 - 18,900 10,400
71 368,500 182,200 128,400 - 41,100 - 16,800 -
72 546,700 264,200 198,900 - 46,700 36,900 - -
73 453,400 220,100 147,300 - 49,400 36,600 - -
74 383,700 186,300 138,900 - 37,300 21,200 - -
75 329,600 140,400 152,500 - 21,200 15,500 - -
76 383,200 146,400 188,300 8,200 27,000 13,300 - -
77 406,600 168,500 177,600 60,500 - - - -
78 324,400 152,100 133,100 39,200 - - - -

2 comments:

Anonymous said...

Thanks Ray, interesting figures. I haven't compared Ford's best year (72) with BMC/Leyland's best year, but I suspect it was quite close...maybe 150,000 cars in it?

There was a documentary on TV this week called 'Ford's Dagenham Dream' which traced the rise and fall of the factory. It is a real shame because what should have remained a successful business was undermined by dreadful industrial relations, which meant that by the 80s Ford gave up on the plant. The key moment was the demolition of the Foundry, after which it was only a matter of time before production was switched abroad. The improvement in relations and productivity in the 90s came too late to save it, though it remains a key centre of engine production.

Chris G

RayCee Smith said...

Industrial relations were very poor in the UK back in that time you mentioned Chris. It is so much better now, perhaps a realisation by both management and workers they cannot afford that sort of situation and be competitive.